A Simple Guide to Make Sure Your Dog and Cat Has All Its Immunization Shots

Posted by Gresham Animal Hospital on Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Gresham Animal Hospital_A Simple Guide to Make Sure Your Dog and Cat Has All Its Immunization Shots-1

National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) is an annual observance held in August to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. If you are like most people, you consider your furry companions as a part of your family, which is why National Immunization Awareness Month also applies to cats and dogs. And if you are like most people you might need help knowing when to vaccinate your dog or your cat. While you should consult your private veterinarian, below is a good guideline of what immunizations are needed and when.

DOGS SHOULD BE GIVEN IMMUNIZATIONS FOR CORE DISEASES EVERY 1-3 YEARS:

Immunizations for Distemper

Distemper is a viral disease that results in fever, watery eyes, loss of energy, decreased appetite, vomiting, and in severe cases, brain damage. The distemper vaccine is typically administered in 3 doses, given when the animal is between 6 and 16 weeks old. Puppies should receive a booster after 1 year, and adult dogs at 3-year intervals thereafter.

Immunizations for Rabies

Rabies comes in a 1-year and a 3-year vaccine. Rabies is 100% fatal to dogs, and rabid animals pose a significant public health hazard to humans. For these reasons, the 1-year rabies vaccine is considered a core vaccine. It can be administered in a single dose to animals as young as 3 months of age. Like the 1-year vaccine, the 3-year rabies vaccine is administered in a single dose beginning when the animal is about 3 months of age. A single booster is recommended after 1 year and boosters at 3-year intervals thereafter.

Immunizations for Adenovirus

This is also known as canine hepatitis. If untreated, canine hepatitis can result in severe liver damage or even death. Viral hepatitis in dogs is a contagious illness spread by contact with urine or feces from infected animals. The vaccine is typically administered in 3 doses, given when the animal is between 6 and 16 weeks old. Puppies should receive a booster after 1 year, and adult dogs at 3-year intervals thereafter.

Immunizations for Bordetella (Parvovirus)

Bordetella is more dangerous and severe for puppies than adults. It is a bacterial illness that is at greatest risk for dogs that board with other dogs often—like show dogs. Vaccine schedules and forms vary; and both intranasal and injected forms of the vaccine are available. Booster frequency depends on risk for exposure.

CATS SHOULD BE GIVEN IMMUNIZATIONS, EVERY THREE YEARS, FOR CORE DISEASES SUCH AS:

Immunizations for Rhinotracheitis

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR) is an infectious disease caused by feline herpesvirus type-1. As with other herpes viruses, the virus is very species specific, and is only known to cause infections in domestic and wild cats. The virus can infect cats of all ages.

Immunizations for Calicivirus

Feline calicivirus (FCV) typically causes upper respiratory disease in cats. It is one of the two major viral causes of respiratory infection in cats (feline herpesvirus type-1 is the other). Cats may experience mild symptoms, but some do suffer severe, life-threatening manifestations of this infection.

This is a core vaccine. All kittens and cats should receive this vaccination. It is generally given as part of a combination vaccine that also protects against FHV-1 and panleukopenia.

This vaccine is administered by subcutaneous injection (injection under the skin) or by intranasal delivery (nose drops).

Immunizations for Rabies

According to the CDC, in 2008-2009 alone, “three times more rabid cats were reported than rabid dogs.” Even if you have an indoor cat, it only takes a single day out and about to get rabies.

Immunizations for Distemper

Feline distemper is a disease more appropriately known as feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), which is sometimes also referred to as feline parvovirus. Despite the name, this contagious disease does not affect a cat’s temperament nor is it related to canine distemper.

Several available vaccines are indicated for preventing disease associated with FPV. Most of the available FPV vaccines are combination vaccines that also protect against feline herpesvirus and calicivirus. It can be administered under the skin or via the nose.

Gresham Animal Hospital is equipped to provide the service and treatment your pet needs under one roof. Keep Gresham Animal Hospital in mind next time your dog or cat needs a checkup, shots, or vaccines. Give us a call at 503.666.1600 to schedule an appointment today.

“You’ll see how much we know, and you’ll know how much we care.”